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  1. Geoff
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  3. Monday, January 18 2016, 12:29 AM
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So I was just on the Float Tank Association site, and it said



1. Hydrogen Peroxide (in ppm) – Min-Max: 20-100, Ideal Range: 30-40



I believe most places keep theirs between 80-100?

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Interesting. I have been operating a center with a single Samadhi tank for 1 year now. During this time i have never ben able to register any reading of the h2o2 whatsoever. I am using "Instatest"strips by LaMotte. I have been shooting for 50ppm but am only able to get a faint reading after letting the test strip sit for over an hour.

I thought about running up to a gallon (a little bit at a time throughtout the course of a closed day) to see if this works but am not sure if this is the right thing to do? I am battling a horrible water supply in this city and keeping the water clean and fresh smelling has alwys been a challenge. I use a carbon filter to fill/refill the tank and it has help a great deal. I am also considering chlorine but again, i am not sure about how to do this.

Does anyone have similar issues and fixes?

Thanks in advance for any feedback.

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Definitely seconding Kane on a gallon being very excessive (with 35% concentration of H2O2). In our own tanks, we've found an ounce of H2O2 to raise the ppm by about 15. So 6 oz would take us at Float On up to 90ppm: tanks vary in how much solution they hold, and so how much H2O2 they need, but the increase will probably end up somewhere in the 10-20ppm range per ounce.



Our current recommendation is to dose up to 80-100ppm H2O2, and to not let it drop below 40 or 50. Anything above 100 and you start to get little bubbles forming on you, and anything under 40-50 and we worry about the levels dipping too far down to a point where they're no longer as effective.



I also strongly suggest steering away from test strips in general. They typically aren't accepted by health departments (if you're being regulated), and even the accurate ones are pretty subjective.



Taylor and LaMotte both make H2O2 titration test kits that seem to be accurate and consistent (we use this one: http://www.novatech-usa.com/Products/Taylor-Water-Analysis-Test-Kits/K-1826).



Are you using UV with your H2O2? If not, I highly suggest looking into a unit (and I'm happy to point you in the right direction for that). Generally, H2O2 + UV is the type of water treatment you want, rather than just H2O2 alone.



I hope this helps, and happy floating!
  1. Graham Talley
  2. more than a month ago
Kane, you are one of the best. As far as shocking goes, I have never done this and wouldn't k of where to start besides going to my nearest pool and spa supply store; although I'm never sure whether or not the same principles apply to our float water solution? Everytime I enter the store I am usually greeted with confused faces like... "here comes that weird float tank guy again".. Lol. Can you recommend an actual product for "Shocking the water"? The information on this forum is incredible, and and I will definitely stay in touch to contribute what I have learned in my first year of operating a float center. Thanks to all here.
  1. Ventura Float Center
  2. more than a month ago
Point well taken. What is difficult when sifting through all of the information out there, is that there seems to be a void when we are talking about classes or consultations on sanitation and maintenance of the water solution. So many of us newbies - 1yr old - are "floating adrift" (pun intended) in our individual businesses without a central body, or a sort of "Float Bible" manual to follow. I have had visits by different pool and spa technicians who believe that UV treatment is a joke? I know enough to follow what the experienced operators in the float industry have to say first and foremost.

I hope to find a complete manual available as this industry grows. For now i am happy to find this forum to be a great asset. Ultimately, i feel that it is a HUUUUGE responsibility for me to offer the cleanest and friendliest facility for people to float and heal. Everyone of these customers will be the word of mouth that we need.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WXbfAEZlmlY

... This is where i found the information about using up to a gallon of H2o2 to get the level back to correct. Pay attention to 1:40 on the timeline. I am not picking on this guy in the video, only using this as an illustration of the different views and thoughts that are out there.
  1. Ventura Float Center
  2. more than a month ago
Excellent contribution Graham. Honestly, Ventura Float Center, I would STRONGLY recommend a class or consultation on sanitation of float solution. Based on what I read here, it appears there is a gap in knowledge that could be costly in the end.
  1. Kane Mantyla
  2. more than a month ago
Just wanted to add that you can get a reverse osmosis filtering system for a clean source of water.
  1. David
  2. more than a month ago
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gail baker Accepted Answer
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Im new to this and am interested in this topic- can someone please tell me what is used to measure the ppm?


 

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Gail - there are test kits like this one, I think Taylor makes one also. It's super easy to use and hopefully accurate. As Kane mentioned, I've also found test strips to be completely useless.



http://catalog.aquaphoenixsci.com/viewitems/single-parameter-test-kits/g-sanitation-test-kits-hydrogen-peroxide-test-kits?bc=100%7C1003%7C1133%7C1176&forward=1
  1. Geoff
  2. more than a month ago
Gail - there are test kits like this one, I think Taylor makes one also. It's super easy to use and hopefully accurate. As Kane mentioned, I've also found test strips to be completely useless.



http://catalog.aquaphoenixsci.com/viewitems/single-parameter-test-kits/g-sanitation-test-kits-hydrogen-peroxide-test-kits?bc=100%7C1003%7C1133%7C1176&forward=1
  1. Geoff
  2. more than a month ago
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Graham Talley Accepted Answer
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Thought I'd chime in since I helped to write those (now outdated) standards, and am also partially responsible for standardizing those 80-100ppm levels.


When we wrote the standards, we were using 30-40ppm as our operating levels. However, during one of our routine water tests (where we had the water sent to a 3rd party lab for analysis) we found bacteria present. It was non-harmful, but as our lab specialist Fred Colley said, "where's there's smoke, there's going to be fire."


After that, we upped our H2O2 levels. Now when we dose our tanks, we bring the levels up to 100ppm and never let them drop below 40-50ppm. Since then, we haven't had any issues.


We use pure, 35% H2O2 for disinfection, and we've actually found that if those levels go above 100-120ppm, you'll get some tickley and distracting bubbles that form on your body during the float. Anecdotally, I can always tell subjectively if our H2O2 levels are high in a tank simply from the bubbles.


Although I'm no longer involved directly with the FTA, I definitely support their efforts, and there's a group of us right now that are working on revised float tank standards that will include this change in the H2O2 levels.


I've included a blog post I wrote on disinfection and safety with H2O2 back in 2014. Hope this helps, and definitely feel free to reach out if you have any questions about this, or anything water sanitation wise for the tanks.

References
  1. http://www.floattanksolutions.com/properly-use-hydrogen-peroxide/
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