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 Floatation Therapy Forum. Have a DIY Tank Question? Want Help with Your Float Center? Ask Here.

  1. zach
  2. DIY Float Tanks
  3. Tuesday, August 25 2015, 02:16 AM
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Hello all!


It has been on my mind constantly and today I started buying materials. I hope to build an affordable tank and share my process and detailed build with the community. I will be working on a budget but willing to spend a little extra. Did I mention this is my first build? I feel people need an easy step by step plan and access to a decent build. That being said I would appreciate some help and feed back from you all. I will document, in detail, my plans and build, as well as results after completion.


I will give you the basics and update as I build! I am currently cleaning out space in my basement to build a tank. I will be constructing a wooden tank with a custom pool liner, probably 4x8 with a 10" water line. The outside frame will be around four and a half feet and most likely some sort of escape pod roof. so far....Tank- 4x8 3/4" ply reinforced with 2x4 frame and corner brackets fit with custom vinyl liner insulated with foam board.



should the foam board be touching the liner? or the outside of the ply?



As I begin this build I would like to ask you for some specific suggestions on pumps and filters and heater for a apx. 200 gallon tank. I'm thinking an inline heater plus some sort of in tank heater for those long floats. I would like a decent turn time but probably only floating up to twice a day. All advice and suggestions welcome.



Of course I am doing a lot of research on water care, but any personal experiences or encounters go a long way with a first build and tank.



Thank you for your time and I look forward to posting more soon!



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that is great information. I am also open to paying more if you have a preference for another. Again I am also thinking in terms of pre purchasing a second pump or replacement parts in case of a malfunction for a quick repair.

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  1. more than a month ago
  2. DIY Float Tanks
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zach Accepted Answer
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I have saved up money and placed an order for my salt as motivation to finish. Does anyone have a specific pump and filter they would suggest? Maybe an amazon link? All links and products will be drafted into a complete parts list at the end of the build!


 


my next steps are to install the liner, finish the lid, figure out how the filtration will work...It does not seem like that should be too hard.

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  1. more than a month ago
  2. DIY Float Tanks
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zach Accepted Answer
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Hi Kane, I'm under the impression the inline heaters are a bit quicker and do not run 24/7, only when the tank drops below temperature. I would like long longer floats though...My biggest reason is to avoid changing out dead heaters if that were to happen. My build does not currently leave much access. I have been looking at the guardian thermal mattress heater, not sure what the max temp on that would be.


With the foam on the bottom, do you suggest the ply sandwich because of the heat from the pads?


 


I have been planning to order a custom fit vinyl liner because I am not familiar with the break down( if any) of pond liners or heavy plastics. But I could get the project done sooner if they turn out to be safe. MY only other question would be fitting tight corners with out cutting and sealing. seems like folds would be a great place for things to grow.


 


thanks for the roof info, having a flat roof would make lining easier, but I do kind of like the look. Ill have to think on it!


I hear Ozone is a common use. Once more I am unfamiliar with the proper venting and health hazards. That being said, I imagine you fine folks may have some advice there. I was thinking of a uv filter and hydrogen peroxide if I understand the disinfectant process correctly.


thanks for the quick response!

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Would you say one water bed heater is enough? also do you enjoy a specific model heater and ozone system?

If budget allows I will probably buy two and install both, one for back up.
  1. zach
  2. more than a month ago
This is all a great help! I am an hour away from starting construction!
  1. zach
  2. more than a month ago
*edit* we have been operating 9* years
  1. Kane Mantyla
  2. more than a month ago
I am going to reply in comment to keep continuity of discussion.



As per heating, if you go with an inline heater, you will also be going with a spa pack for the controller. If you want lights and accessories, this might not be a bad option as they will all plug into the pack. But do understand that these are designed for spas which are completely different than a floatation tank. Mainly, a spa can drop temperature with no issues, whereas if a floatation tank drops temperature, the Epsom Salt can re-crystalize. The way spa pack inline heating works is the thermocouple is in the spa pack which is outside of the tank. This means that temperatures will fluctuate more before the pump is activated.



A waterbed heater will maintain a constant temperature indefinitely. Also, we have 4 floatation tanks and have been operating for 4 years and have had 2 heaters go out. They are very durable.



For the floor, depending on setup, you will want ply on top of the foam so you don't compress it when you step in. If you place the tank on isolation pads, you will also want ply under so the pads don't push through. Even on the sides, sandwiching the foam primarily if for the integrity of the foam. It is not durable to pressure and ply protects it. Given ply is cheap, it wouldn't make sense not to.



An easy work around for the liner is to simply use samadhis dimensions and order one from them. They run about $250 so might be more expensive, but all the seams are welded and the fit is tight. I would recommend against lining the ceiling as you will want to be able to remove the ceiling for filling the tank and maintenance. Simply coating with waterproofing will be fine.



The health hazards of ozone are blown out of proportion. I think much of it focused around a newer form of ozone therapy in which people were intentionally breathing high concentrations of ozone which damaged lung tissue. Oxidized lung tissue regenerates itself, the problem occurs when people have long term exposure to higher concentrations or acute exposure to extremely high concentrations. The risk for use as sanitizer is very low unless you constantly have it running and are immersed in the environment regularly. I prefer O3 because it is a gas and completely permeates the solution and then evaporates into the cabin completely killing all molds and mildews. Both UV and O3 destroy biofilm, the protective layer that bacteria produce but UV requires that the biofilm pass under the light, whereas the O3 will find it anywhere. Do note that h2o2 or any chlorine based agent will not destroy all biofilm so either UV or O3 is required.
  1. Kane Mantyla
  2. more than a month ago
For ozone, we used to go with Ozotech, but have switched to Del Ozone. The output is the same and they are more economical. Del Ozone is also making advancements in regulating concentration of ozone with degassers.



This is the model I recommend.

http://www.amazon.com/DEL-Ozone-MCD-50-High-Output/dp/B005KJI7GU



As per heater, having one backup is a good idea. Don't run both at same time as they will cycle faster and have lower life span.



The following works good, just cut off proprietary controller and attach standard nema plug to it to connect to PID controller

http://www.amazon.com/Calesco-Full-Watt-Waterbed-Heater/dp/B0061RXP58
  1. Kane Mantyla
  2. more than a month ago
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  1. more than a month ago
  2. DIY Float Tanks
  3. # 3
Kane Mantyla Accepted Answer
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Sounds awesome Zach. Be cool if you did a blog series on it here. For 200 gallons, 35gpm is adequate. If not a mag drive, make sure there is a salt seal. What is the purpose of inline heating? You will want to keep your water to temperature at all times to keep from recrystalization. Any constant heating from the bottom will do this.


Obviously any foam board on bottom would require at least 1/2" ply on top. Sandwiching the foam with ply on the sides would be best, but if it were between foam exposed outside or inside, I'd opt inside.


For simple home build, angling the ceiling doesn't serve much purpose except for looking cooler. You need a 30% grade to keep droplets from forming so wiping down a slanted roof vs a float roof is the same unless you want to angle it that much. Escape pods have ventilation system to keep droplets from forming on ceiling.


Much of your water quality will be based on the method of sanitation you choose. My personal choice for home use is ozone with h2o2 kept at 200ppm. UV with weekly h2o2 hocking is another good method for lower use tanks.


Ask more questions and good luck!

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  1. more than a month ago
  2. DIY Float Tanks
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